Top 10 excuses why ADF has a slow(er than Oracle and organizations desire) uptake

So many of these are related, that I decided to simply list them in no specific order:

  1. “The technology changes/improves too rapidly, and I have fears of 1) ‘will what I am doing become old-school soon’ and 2) ‘is a new/better way of doing going to be released within a few months’.”
  2. “The documentation is daunting.”
  3. “The suggested pre-requisites and structured learning programs seem to change every few months.”
  4. “I have spent considerable time and money hiring smart coders that don’t take to 4GL development as readily.”
  5. “Code generating technologies have some negative connotations when it comes to code cleanliness, efficiency, and performance.”
  6. “There are ‘too many’ choices. Just show me the right way and the best practice.”
  7. “Deeper customization required to fit my specific implementation needs are much less 4GL and have a steeper development learning curve.”
  8. “There aren’t enough ‘experts’ readily available in the market that really know what they’re doing that would drive my ability to hire resources for low-to-medium cost, schedule a rapid delivery (ramp up, implement, deliver, support), or ensure what is being done is being done the ‘right way’.”
  9. “ADF is an end-to-end framework, so I need resources that understand the entire stack to be on the same page about the approach we are taking.”
  10. “This is nothing like anything I have worked with before.”

All this said, Oracle ADF is a core technology that any “Oracle shop” needs to seriously consider investing in at this point as Oracle itself continues to invest further in this as the baseline for both Fusion Middleware and Fusion Applications.

Knowing what organizations are facing with ADF helps us stay one step ahead of ensuring we can help you get to where you need to be, so contact us to find out more about how we can help.

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